Doheny, Anthony

Doheny, Anthony

Education and Background

Anthony received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree from Stanford University, his Master of Arts in Music from the University of Iowa, and a Diploma in Music from the Sydney Conservatorium in Australia.  He has been a student of Charles Treger and Robert Miller.

Anthony has performed as a violinist in annual chamber music concerts, entitled “Anthony Doheny and Friends” in San Francisco; with distinguished former students and colleagues; and in numerous faculty solo recitals and chamber music performances at both the University of Melbourne and Monash University, at Queensland Conservatorium and throughout Australia.  He has made frequent broadcasts for the Australian Broadcasting Commission and appeared in concertos with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, the Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra and other orchestras in Australia. On his most recent trip to Australia, Anthony performed for broadcast the Tartini Concerto in D minor with a string orchestra. He also launched a new CD of his piano compositions at the Steinway House in Brisbane.

Anthony’s recordings include “Soul of the Viola,” featuring original compositions for viola and piano, intended to fill gaps in the relatively small repertoire for the viola; also, “Timeless Song,” featuring original compositions for voice, violin, and piano.

Anthony has toured Hawaii, Canada and the United States as a member of the Australian Aulos Ensemble, and he has made concerto appearances with the Kansas City Philharmonic Orchestra.

Anthony has also performed as a pianist and piano accompanist.  He is highly regarded as an accompanist and duo-sonata pianist.  Additionally, Anthony has conducted the Queensland Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra and a string orchestra for very young players in Palo Alto, which went on to become the Super Strings training orchestra of the Palo Alto Chamber Orchestra.

Anthony is a Lecturer in Violin at Stanford University.

Teaching Philosophy

“I have always tried hard to help my students realize the joy of making and being involved in music. I hope that music and its attendant joy will be an important part of the rest of their lives, regardless of whether music is a career or an avocation.”